Monday, 16 April 2012

The Crimes Of The North

On last week’s live broadcast of The Political Cesspool Radio Program, we continued our annual series honoring Confederate History Month.

As our celebration of this event continues throughout the month of April, you will hear us talk about some of the great legends of the Confederacy; stories of heroism that, perhaps, you’d never heard of before.

We’ll tell you about the crew of the H.L. Hunley, the Confederate submarine that became the first to ever sink an enemy ship in naval warfare. We’ll talk about Tennessee Governor Isham Harris, who, while still Governor, fought alongside his countrymen in battle, and so much more!

If you’ve never heard of these stories before, I encourage you to research them and learn more. Confederate History is something that should be honored and celebrated year round, not just in April.

Right now, however, I want to tell you the story of DeWitt Smith Jobe, a man whose name came up during last Saturday’s interview with Perry Short. Jobe was a Confederate scout whose sacrifice was one of amazing courage:

DeWitt Smith Jobe enlisted in 1861 and became part of Company B of the 20th Tennessee Regiment commanded by Col. Joel Battle and his cousin Thomas B. Smith.

He was wounded and captured at the Battle of Fishing Creek and fought at Stones River. Jobe was hand-picked as a scout about the time Maj. Gen. Braxton Bragg began his retreat out of Middle Tennessee and into Georgia.

As a scout, Jobe did escape the doldrums of routine military life, but his new role with the Army of Tennessee was far more dangerous. Many of the members of Coleman’s Scouts were shot, killed or imprisoned.

And each of the Scouts knew about Sam Davis’ end on the Union gallows near Pulaski, Tenn.

In August 1864, Jobe and fellow scout Tom Joplin were far behind Union lines and reconnoitering near College Grove, Triune and Nolensville.

On Monday, Aug. 29, Jobe was hiding in a cornfield after eating breakfast at the home of a family between Triune and Nolensville. He had an important message hidden on his person. With Yankee patrols in the area, the Confederate was hiding during the day and traveling at night.

Unfortunately, he was spotted by a patrol of 15 men from the 115th Ohio Regiment of the Union Army of the Cumberland.

Seeing that he was about to be captured, Jobe tore up the note and began to chew and swallow it.

Angered by the near miss, the Union patrol first threatened Jobe and then began to torture him in an effort to get the scout to divulge the content of the dispatch.

The Ohio troops first hanged Jobe from a bridle rein and then pistol-whipped him, knocking out some of his teeth.

“Bound and disarmed, helpless and bleeding, Jobe revealed nothing. They were dealing with a man in gray who held the welfare of the Confederacy above his life,” wrote Ed Huddleston in “The Civil War in Middle Tennessee.

“The torture went on. The Yanks were whooping now, yelling so loudly that they could be heard at a distant farmhouse.

“They put out Jobe’s eyes. Perhaps then it was that Jobe heaped epithets upon them. How much courage did it take to do what they did then? They cut out Jobe’s tongue,” Huddleston wrote.

The Union patrol finished off Jobe by dragging him to death behind his own galloping horse.

D.S. Jobe was was hanged, pistol-whipped, had his eyes gouged out, and tongue cut off before finally be dragged to death by a horse. Once again, we can compare and contrast the nobility of the Confederate soldier to the savage nature of the Union Army.

Jobe never gave up his fellow soldiers, choosing to die a painful death rather than betray his country. How many of today’s business and political heavyweights would do the same?

Our on-air celebration of Confederate History Month 2012 will continue each Saturday night in April, exclusively on The Political Cesspool Radio Program.

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1 comment:

Anonymous said...

A little known fact, there are still alive men and women who's Father's fought in the US civil war.

The pdf is from 2011, so a few may have died on this list.

And, there are only 2 people still alive who are still receiving civil war pensions.